IMG_6615


Leave a comment

Pallet Planter

Happy Spring! It’s finally here so bust out your seeds and starting planting. I started some seedlings indoors last week and today built somewhere for them to go when it finally stays warm out there. It’s a pallet planter. This container is great for shallow planting. Think kale, not carrots.IMG_6615

I picked up a pallet from a neighbor in my building at work and quickly learned why he was happy to give it away. First and foremost, pallets are ridiculously hard to take apart and turn into something else. Secondly, they do not fit into a Honda Civic. So find a friend with a big vehicle and skip the pallet deconstruction phase. Also, pick up some landscape fabric and grab your staple gun.

IMG_6605Flip her over and staple the landscape fabric onto the back. Pull it taut and leave some overhang to cover the edges. You’ll need it to hold in the dirt.

IMG_6606

 

IMG_6607

Once things are secure on the bottom, turn the pallet over and work on the sides. Fold over the top of the fabric like a seam and staple it to the sides.

IMG_6611

Now it’s time to fill it up! You’ll need about 4 CU ft of dirt. Of course it’s best if you make your own compost but if you live in an apartment and need to build a portable planter like this one, you probably don’t compost. Chat with the folks at your local nursery and they will hook you up with a good mix.

IMG_6617

Now you’re ready to plant kale, spinach, lettuce and herbs with no weeding required.

XOXO
Chels

IMG_6513


1 Comment

Simple Spring Scarf

It’s warm in Denver today but don’t be fooled, March will be the snowiest month of the year! On days like this I still dream about Spring. I can’t wait to bike to the farmer’s market and hike without wearing a jacket. Alas, I must wait a bit longer to thaw out but in the meantime, let’s make a cute scarf so we’re fashionable when it finally warms up a bit.IMG_6512

For this project you’ll need about 1/2 yd of sheer fabric like voile, elastic thread, regular thread and of course something to cut your fabric. A rotary cutter, mat and ruler work well.

IMG_6506

Cut your fabric into two strips that are about 6 inches wide and 60 inches long. Sew the strips together to create one super long piece of fabric. Then fold over all of the edges twice and iron into place. Creating a finished seam will keep the sheer fabric from fraying.

IMG_6502

Topstitch around the entire scarf with regular thread to make that finished edge.

IMG_6503

Now load up your bobbin with elastic thread. You may have to hand wind it. Make sure to keep some tension on it while you wind. Load the elastic thread on the bottom and normal thread on top. Then sew two straight lines directly down the middle of your scarf about 1/2 inch apart. You’ll see the fabric gathering as you sew!

IMG_6513

That’s it! Now you’re ready for Spring whenever it decides to arrive.

XOXO
Chels

 

 

IMG_6585


1 Comment

Overnight Refrigerator Oatmeal

Do you ever dash out of the house totally late for work without eating breakfast? I do it all the time. So here’s a great solution for those mornings when you just can’t get it together in time: refrigerator oatmeal!IMG_6597

I made a few of these on Sunday night and managed to feed myself breakfast every day last week because they were ready to go when I rushed out the door. Just so there are no surprises, I’ll warn you that the texture of this oatmeal concoction is less like oatmeal and more like Chia Seed Pudding. Chia seed pudding rocks my socks so I’m cool with it. I hope you will be too.

Let’s get started. You’ll need a few pint-sized mason jars with lids. Also, grab some oats. I used a mixture of rolled and steel cut oats for texture variation. Quick cooking oats might get a bit soggy. You’ll also need some milk, chia seeds, honey, vanilla extract and any fruit or nut additions you’d like to make. Try blackberry and coconut or toss in some preserves.

IMG_6585

For each jar you’ll need 1/4 cup of oats, 2 teaspoons of chia seeds, 1 teaspoon of honey, a splash of vanilla extract and about 1/2 cup of unsweetened almond milk (or any other milk of your choice). Toss these ingredients along with your berries, dried fruit, jam or nuts into a mason jar. Shake well to combine and stick it in the fridge! The next morning, stuff one in your bag on your way to work and get out the door! Let us know in the comments if you come up with any exciting new flavor variations.

Overnight Refrigerator Oatmeal

Overnight Refrigerator Oatmeal

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup old fashioned oats
  • 2 teaspoons chia seeds
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • 1/2 cup unsweetend almond milk
  • Splash of vanilla extract
  • Fruit, coconut, jam, etc.

Instructions

  1. Combine all ingredients in a pint-sized mason jar.
  2. Shake to mix.
  3. Refrigerate overnight.
http://www.hipsteaders.com/2014/01/overnight-refrigerator-oatmeal/

XOXO
Chels

IMG_6580


Leave a comment

Recycled Bicycle Tube Card Wallet

I’m working on sticking to some New Year’s Resolutions from 2013. That’s right, remember these? Well, I busted out the 1936 Kenmore to see if this magnificent machine could handle my toughest sewing project yet: bike tube. Unfortunately, rubber is sticky and the best way to handle that ended up being a walking foot on my newer and not quite as cool Singer. Anyway, check out this project. Next time you get a flat in the middle of the longest ride ever, take a deep breath and keep that inner tube! Here’s just one of a zillion different things that you can make out of it.IMG_6580

Grab that inner tube that you carried all the way home. Cut out the valve, cut it in half along the length of the tube and clean it up with some warm soapy water. You’ll also need some heavy duty thread, a walking foot and some duct tape.

IMG_6569

Cut out two tube pieces: 1) 2.5 inches by 8 inches and 2) 2.5 inches by 3 inches. Once again because rubber is sticky, when I made the first version of this wallet, it was almost impossible to get cards in and out of it. So, start by lining the inside parts of your wallet pieces with duct tape.

IMG_6573

Simply stick duct tape to the inside of each tubing piece and then trim the edges. Now fold the longest piece in half and position the shorter strip on top to create the front pocket. Pinning tube rubber does not work very well so I used binding clips for quilting instead. If you don’t have any of these, regular binder clips will work as well.

IMG_6576

Trim the tops of your wallet pockets to make them look nice before you sew it all together. Now simply sew around the edges using your walking foot and a sturdy needle. I used one for denim. Don’t forget to reverse a bit on each end!

XOXO
Chels

IMG_6530


3 Comments

Potato Chip Patina

Let’s continue our journey into jewelry making with a super easy tutorial for coloring copper. We’re going to make an acidic patina or tarnish using potato chips! It will produce beautiful blue-green patches on your copper piece as you can see on the dragonfly on this necklace.IMG_6560Hit up the chip aisle to gather your supplies. You’ll need salt and vinegar potato chips, white vinegar, a plastic container and of course some copper.IMG_6517Smash up a few hands full of chips and place them in your plastic container. Next, cover with vinegar and mix up until the chips are pretty squishy.IMG_6518

Cut a copper sheet into your desired shape and bury it beneath the squishy chips making sure there is plenty of contact between copper and chips. Allow the copper to sit in the chips overnight. You’ll be developing copper sulfate and chloride salts of copper on the surface.

IMG_6530

The next day, you’ll have something like this including a little chip goo. Let the pieces dry and gently brush off any residual potato chips. Then seal up your pieces with a clear sealant. I used some clear nail polish. Once the sealant has dried, your potato chip patina is ready to go on your next jewelry project!

XOXO
Chels